Groups

A group or family is a vertical column in the periodic table. Groups are considered the most important method of classifying the elements. In some groups, the elements have very similar properties and exhibit a clear trend in properties down the group. These groups tend to be given trivial (unsystematic) names, e.g., the alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, halogens,pnictogens, chalcogens, and noble gases. Some other groups in the periodic table display fewer similarities and/or vertical trends (for example Group 14), and these have no trivial names and are referred to simply by their group numbers.

Periods

A period is a horizontal row in the periodic table. Although groups are the most common way of classifying elements, there are some regions of the periodic table where the horizontal trends and similarities in properties are more significant than vertical group trends. This can be true in the d-block (or "transition metals"), and especially for the f-block, where thelanthanides and actinides form two substantial horizontal series of elements.

Blocks

external image 350px-PTable_structure.pngexternal image magnify-clip.pngThis diagram shows the periodic table blocks
Because of the importance of the outermost shell, the different regions of the periodic table are sometimes referred to asperiodic table blocks, named according to the subshell in which the "last" electron resides. The s-block comprises the first two groups (alkali metals and alkaline earth metals) as well as hydrogen and helium. The p-block comprises the last six groups (groups 13 through 18) and contains, among others, all of the semimetals. The d-block comprises groups 3 through 12 and contains all of the transition metals. The f-block, usually offset below the rest of the periodic table, comprises the rare earth metals.

Other

The chemical elements are also grouped together in other ways. Some of these groupings are often illustrated on the periodic table, such as transition metals, poor metals, and metalloids. Other informal groupings exist, such as theplatinum group and the noble metals

taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Table_of_elements#Classification

what is the periodic table of elements?


The periodic table is the most important chemistry reference there is. It arranges all the known elements in an informative array. Elements are arranged left to right and top to bottom in order of increasing atomic number. Order generally coincides with increasing atomic mass.
The different rows of elements are called periods. The period number of an element signifies the highest energy level an electron in that element occupies (in the unexcited state). The number of electrons in a period increases as one traverses down the periodic table; therefore, as the energy level of the atom increases, the number of energy sub-levels per energy level increases.
Using the data in the table scientists, students, and others that are familiar with the periodic table can extract information concerning individual elements. For instance, a scientist can use carbon's atomic mass to determine how many carbon atoms there are in a 1 kilogram block of carbon.
People also gain information from the periodic table by looking at how it is put together. By examining an element's position on the periodic table, one can infer the electron configuration. Elements that lie in the same column on the periodic table (called a "group") have identical valance electron configurations and consequently behave in a similar fashion chemically. For instance, all the group 18 elements are inert gases. The periodic table contains an enormous amount of important information. People familiar with how the table is put together can quickly determine a significant amount of information about an element, even if they have never heard of it.



The periodic table of the chemical elements is a tabular display of the chemical elements. Although precursors to this table exist, its invention is generally credited to Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev in 1869, who intended the table to illustrate recurring ("periodic") trends in the properties of the elements. The layout of the table has been refined and extended over time, as new elements have been discovered, and new theoretical models have been developed to explain chemical behavior.
The periodic table is now ubiquitous within the academic discipline of chemistry, providing an extremely useful framework to classify, systematize, and compare all of the many different forms of chemical behavior. The table has found wide application in chemistry, physics biology, and engineering, especially chemical engineering. The current standard table contains 118 elements as of March 2010.


taken from:www.wikipedia/periodictableofelements.com
external image periodic_table.gif







Periodec table of the elements.

The periodic table of the chemical elements (also Mendeleev's table, periodic table of the elements or just periodic table) is a tabular display of the chemical elements. Although precursors to this table exist, its invention is generally credited to Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev in 1869, who intended the table to illustrate recurring ("periodic") trends in the properties of the elements. The layout of the table has been refined and extended over time, as new elements have been discovered, and new theoretical models have been developed to explain chemical behavior.
The periodic table is now ubiquitous within the academic discipline of chemistry, providing an extremely useful framework to classify, systematize, and compare all of the many different forms of chemical behavior. The table has found wide application in chemistry, physics, biology, and engineering, especially chemical engineering. The current standard table contains 117 elements as of July 2009 (elements 1–116 and element 118).


The periodic table is the most important chemistry reference there is. It arranges all the known elements in an informative array. Elements are arranged left to right and top to bottom in order of increasing atomic number. Order generally coincides with increasing atomic mass.
The different rows of elements are called periods. The period number of an element signifies the highest energy level an electron in that element occupies (in the unexcited state). The number of electrons in a period increases as one traverses down the periodic table; therefore, as the energy level of the atom increases, the number of energy sub-levels per energy level increases.
Using the data in the table scientists, students, and others that are familiar with the periodic table can extract information concerning individual elements. For instance, a scientist can use carbon's atomic mass to determine how many carbon atoms there are in a 1 kilogram block of carbon.
People also gain information from the periodic table by looking at how it is put together. By examining an element's position on the periodic table, one can infer the electron configuration. Elements that lie in the same column on the periodic table (called a "group") have identical valance electron configurations and consequently behave in a similar fashion chemically. For instance, all the group 18 elements are inert gases. The periodic table contains an enormous amount of important information. People familiar with how the table is put together can quickly determine a significant amount of information about an element, even if they have never heard of it.

· Atomic Number
The number of protons in an atom defines what element it is. For example carbon atoms have six protons, hydrogen atoms have one, and oxygen atoms have eight. The number of protons in an atom is referred to as the atomic number of that element. The number of protons in an atom also determines the chemical behavior of the element.


· Atomic Symbol:
The atomic symbol is one or two letters chosen to represent an element ("H" for "hydrogen," etc.). These symbols are used internationally. Typically, a symbol is the truncated name of the element or the truncated Latin name of the element. Click here for a list of the elements and their symbols.


· Atomic Mass:
The atomic mass is the average mass of an element in atomic mass units ("amu"). Though individual atoms always have an integer number of atomic mass units, the atomic mass on the periodic table is stated as a decimal number because it is an average of the various isotopes of an element. Isotopes can have a weight either more or less than the average. The average number of neutrons for an element can be found by subtracting the number of protons (atomic number) from the atomic mass.


· Electron Configuration:
The electron configuration is the orbital description of the locations of the electrons in an unexcited atom. Using principles of physics, chemists can predict how atoms will react based upon the electron configuration. They can predict properties such as stability, boiling point, and conductivity. Typically, only the outermost electron shells matter in chemistry, so we truncate the inner electron shell notation by replacing the long-hand orbital description with the symbol for a noble gas in brackets. This method of notation vastly simplifies the description for large molecules.
Example: The electron configuration for Be is 1s22s,2 but we write [He]2s2 where [He] is equivalent to all the electron orbitals in the helium atom. The Letters, s, p, d, and f designate the shape of the orbitals and the superscript gives the number of electrons in that orbital.

//http://periodic.lanl.gov/use.html//

taken of //http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Periodic_table//




Group
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
Period
1

1H

2He
2
3Li
4Be

5B
6C
7N
8O
9F
10Ne
3
11Na
12Mg

13Al
14Si
15P
16S
17Cl
18Ar
4
19K
20Ca
21Sc
22Ti
23V
24Cr
25Mn
26Fe
27Co
28Ni
29Cu
30Zn
31Ga
32Ge
33As
34Se
35Br
36Kr
5
37Rb
38Sr
39Y
40Zr
41Nb
42Mo
43Tc
44Ru
45Rh
46Pd
47Ag
48Cd
49In
50Sn
51Sb
52Te
53I
54Xe
6
55Cs
56Ba
57La
72Hf
73Ta
74W
75Re
76Os
77Ir
78Pt
79Au
80Hg
81Tl
82Pb
83Bi
84Po
85At
86Rn
7
87Fr
88Ra
89Ac
104Rf
105Db
106Sg
107Bh
108Hs
109Mt
110Ds
111Rg
112Cn



58Ce
59Pr
60Nd
61Pm
62Sm
63Eu
64Gd
65Tb
66Dy
67Ho
68Er
69Tm
70Yb
71Lu


90Th
91Pa
92U
93Np
94Pu
95Am
96Cm
97Bk
98Cf
99Es
100Fm
101Md
102No
103Lr


Periodic Table Key

X
Synthetic Elements
X
Liquids or melt at close to room temp.
X
Solids
X
Gases
Alkali Metals
Alkali Earth Metals
Transition Metals
Other Metals
Metalloids
Other Non Metals
Halogens
Noble Gases
Rare Earth Metals
Periodic Table

is taken from :http://www.chemicool.com/
The periodic table of the chemical elements (also Mendeleev's table, periodic table of the elements or just periodic table) is a tabular display of the chemical elements. Although precursors to this table exist, its invention is generally credited to Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev in 1869, who intended the table to illustrate recurring ("periodic") trends in the properties of the elements. The layout of the table has been refined and extended over time, as new elements have been discovered, and new theoretical models have been developed to explain chemical behavior.[[#cite_note-0|[1]]]
The periodic table is now ubiquitous within the academic discipline of chemistry, providing an extremely useful framework to classify, systematize, and compare all of the many different forms of chemical behavior. The table has found wide application in chemistry, physics, biology, and engineering, especially chemical engineering. The current standard table contains 117 elements as of July 2009 (elements 1116 and element 118).
external image periodic.gifis taken for:www.wikipedia.org


Alchemical Symbols of the Elements

The word alchemy comes from the Arabian al-kimia, referring to the preparation of 'Elixir' or the 'Stone' by the Egyptians. The Arabic kimia, in turn, comes from the Coptic khem, which referred to the fertile black Nile delta soil and also to the dark mystery of the primordial First Matter (the Khem). Do you recognize the origin of the word 'chemistry'?
Although single symbols are presented here, there were often many symbols for an element. For a time, the astronomical symbols of the planets were used to denote the elements. However, as alchemists came to be persecuted, particularly in medieval times, secret symbols were invented. This led to a great deal of confusion, so you will find some overlap of symbols. The symbols were in common use through the 17th century; some are still in use today.
taken from: http://chemistry.about.com/od/alchemicalsymbols/a/alchemyindex.htm
groups
A group or family is a vertical column in the periodic table. Groups are considered the most important method of classifying the elements. In some groups, the elements have very similar properties and exhibit a clear trend in properties down the group. These groups tend to be given trivial (unsystematic) names, e.g., the alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, halogens, pnictogens, chalcogens, and noble gases. Some other groups in the periodic table display fewer similarities and/or vertical trends (for example Group 14), and these have no trivial names and are referred to simply by their group numbers.

periods
A period is a horizontal row in the periodic table. Although groups are the most common way of classifying elements, there are some regions of the periodic table where the horizontal trends and similarities in properties are more significant than vertical group trends. This can be true in the d-block (or "transition metals"), and especially for the f-block, where the lanthanides and actinides form two substantial horizontal series of elements.

blocks

Because of the importance of the outermost shell, the different regions of the periodic table are sometimes referred to as periodic table blocks, named according to the subshell in which the "last" electron resides. The s-block comprises the first two groups (alkali metals and alkaline earth metals) as well as hydrogen and helium. The p-block comprises the last six groups (groups 13 through 18) and contains, among others, all of the semimetals. The d-block comprises groups 3 through 12 and contains all of the transition metals. The f-block, usually offset below the rest of the periodic table, comprises the rare earth metals.
taken from:http: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Periodic_table#Classification

File:PTable structure.png
File:PTable structure.png

The periodic table of the elements classifies, organizes and distributes the different chemical elements, in conformity with his(her,your) properties and characteristics. One is in the habit of attributing the table to Dimitri Mendeleiev, who arranged the elements being based on the manual variation of the chemical properties, though Julius Lothar Meyer, working separately, carried out a classification from the physical properties of the atoms. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lyVsXAVE7cQ video
tablaperiodica.jpg
tablaperiodica.jpg

taken form: http://www.elmundo.es/traductor/and
[[http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tabla_periódica_de_los_elementos]]



Periodic Table

the periodic table the elements are not randomly located there are several rules to organize the elements
1.regions
Group 1 (IA): alkali
Group 2 (IIA): alkaline
Group 3 (IIIB)
Group 4 (IVB)
Group 5 (VB)
Group 6 (VIB): lanthanides
Group 7 (VIIB)
Group 8 (VIIIB)
Group 9 (VIIIB)
Group 10 (VIIIB)
Group 11 (IB): metal coin

Group 12 (IIB)
Group 13 (IIIA): earth
Group 14 (IVA): carbonoideos
Group 15 (VA): nitrogenoideos
Group 16 (VIA) Chalcogen or chalcogens
Group 17 (VIIA) Halogen
Group 18 (VIIIA) Noble gases
2.Period
In the periodic table of elements, a period is each row of the table.

The number of energy levels an atom has determines the period to which it belongs. Each level is divided into various sub-levels, that with increasing atomic number are filling in this order
3.The Blocks:

are named after the letter refers to the outermost orbital: s, p, d and f Could have more elements than other orbitals fill, but have not been synthesized or discovered, in this case is continued to name them alphabetically.

Block s
Block p
Block d
Block f
Block g


  • Block s:The elements of the block s (to have their valence electrons in the s) are those that lie in groups 1 and 2 of the periodic table of elements. In these elements the outermost energy level corresponds to orbital s.
  • Block P: P block elements (for having their valence electrons in the orbital p) are those located in groups 13 to 18 of the periodic table of elements. In these elements the outermost energy level corresponds to p orbitals.
  • Block D : D block elements (for having electrons in the orbital d) are those that lie in groups 3 to 12 in the periodic table of elements. In these elements the outermost energy level corresponds to d orbitals.
  • Block f: F block elements (for having their valence electrons in the orbital f) are two series, one starting from the element lanthanum and actinium from another, so the elements of these series are called lanthanides and actinides. Although the periodic table of elements would have to be after these two elements represent are usually separated from the rest. Also known as rare earths.
  • Block G: The elements of the block g represent a hypothetical group, unobserved, of elements that would be beyond the already discovered transuranic elements, and where would deal a new orbit.
the elements have properties which are also organized


​ taken from: ​ http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grupo_de_la_tabla_peri%C3%B3dica http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Periodo_de_la_tabla_peri%C3%B3dica http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloque_de_la_tabla_peri%C3%B3dica http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elementos_del_bloque_s http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elementos_del_bloque_d http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elementos_del_bloque_p http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elementos_del_bloque_f
http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elementos_del_bloque_g





Periodic table of the elements

The periodic table of the chemical elements is a tubular display of the chemical elements. Although precursors to this table exist, its invention is generally credited to Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev in 1869, who intended the table to illustrate recurring ("periodic") trends in the properties of the elements. The layout of the table has been refined and extended over time, as new elements have been discovered, and new theoretical models have been developed to explain chemical behavior.


periodic-table.gif

Classification




Groups
A group or family is a vertical column in the periodic table. Groups are considered the most important method of classifying the elements. In some groups, the elements have very similar properties and exhibit a clear trend in properties down the group. These groups tend to be given trivial names, e.g., the alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, halogens, pcnitogens, chalcogens, and noble gases. Some other groups in the periodic table display fewer similarities and/or vertical trends , and these have no trivial names and are referred to simply by their group numbers.

Periods


A period is a horizontal row in the periodic table. Although groups are the most common way of classifying elements, there are some regions of the periodic table where the horizontal trends and similarities in properties are more significant than vertical group trends. This can be true in thedblock , and especially for the f block, where the lanthanides and actinides form two substantial horizontal series of elements.

Blocks

Because of the importance of the outermost shell, the different regions of the periodic table are sometimes referred to as periodic tables block, named according to the subshell in which the "last" electron resides. The s block comprises the first two groups as well as hydrogen and helium. The p block comprises the last six groups and contains, among others, all of the semimetals. The d block comprises groups 3 through 12 and contains all of the transition metals. The f block, usually offset below the rest of the periodic table, comprises the rare earth metals

Other

The chemical elements are also grouped together in other ways. Some of these groupings are often illustrated on the periodic table, such as transition metals, poor metals, and metalloids. Other informal groupings exist, such as the platinium group and the noble metals.

Taken From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Periodic_table

ALFABETICAL LIST OF ELEMENTS//
Actinium
Aluminum
Americium
Antimony
Argon
Arsenic
Astatine
Barium
Berkelium
Beryllium
Bismuth
Bohrium
Boron
Bromine
Cadmium
Calcium
Californium
Carbon
Cerium
Cesium
Chlorine
Chromium
Cobalt
Copper
Curium
Darmstadtium
Dubnium
Dysprosium
Einsteinium
Erbium
Europium
Fermium
Fluorine
Francium
Gadolinium
Gallium
Germanium
Gold
Hafnium
Hassium
Helium
Holmium
Hydrogen
Indium
Iodine
Iridium
Iron
Krypton
Lanthanum
Lawrencium
Lead
Lithium
Lutetium
Magnesium
Manganese
Meitnerium
Mendelevium
Mercury
Molybdenum
Neodymium
Neon
Neptunium
Nickel
Niobium
Nitrogen
Nobelium
Osmium
Oxygen
Palladium
Phosphorus
Platinum
Plutonium
Polonium
Potassium
Praseodymium
Promethium
Protactinium
Radium
Radon
Rhenium
Rhodium
Rubidium
Ruthenium
Rutherfordium
Samarium
Scandium
Seaborgium
Selenium
Silicon
Silver
Sodium
Strontium
Sulfur
Tantalum
Technetium
Tellurium
Terbium
Thallium
Thorium
Thulium
Tin
Titanium
Tungsten
Ununbium
Ununnilium
Ununumium
Uranium
Vanadium
Xenon
Ytterbium
Yttrium
Zinc
Zirconium
TAKEN FROM: http://chemistry.about.com/od/periodictableelements/a/elementlist.-Nwj.htm


Element 112 likely to be named copernicium: proposed name honours astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus
In honour of scientist and astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus (1473-1543), the discovering team around Professor Sigurd Hofmann suggested the name copernicium with the element symbol Cn (original suggestion was Cp) for the new element 112, discovered at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (Center for Heavy Ion Research) in Darmstadt. It was Copernicus who discovered that the Earth orbits the Sun, thus paving the way for our modern view of the world. Thirteen years ago, element 112 was discovered by an international team of scientists at the GSI accelerator facility. A few weeks ago, the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, IUPAC, officially confirmed their discovery. In around six months (Dec 2009 - Jan 2010?), IUPAC will officially endorse the new element's name, or not. This period is set to allow the scientific community to discuss the suggested name copernicium before the IUPAC naming.
external image moz-screenshot.png
external image moz-screenshot-1.pngexternal image moz-screenshot-2.pngexternal image moz-screenshot-3.pngexternal image moz-screenshot-4.pngexternal image moz-screenshot-5.pngexternal image moz-screenshot-6.png takenfrom:http://www.webelements.com/biology.html